Intestinal Disorders

Crohn's Disease

Crohn's Disease

Crohn's disease is an inflammatory disease that can affect any section of the digestive tract: from the mouth to the end of the large intestine, or its parts. It typically affects the ileocecal area, i.e. the end of the small intestine and the beginning of the large intestine. The most common symptoms of this disease are watery diarrhea (rarely with an admixture of blood), abdominal pain, general malaise, and weight loss. Patients often develop anemia and symptoms of malnutrition. The basic diagnostic method is to perform a colonoscopy with a biopsy from the pathologically changed sites. Treatment mainly consists of pharmacotherapy, but in some cases, surgery may be necessary.

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory disease that affects the final section of the digestive tract. Lesions begin in the rectum and may progress through all segments of the large intestine to the junction with the small intestine. The main symptoms are diarrhea with blood and mucus, anemia, and abdominal pain. The basic method of diagnosis is colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy with biopsy. Patients are most commonly subject to pharmacotherapy, but in the case of a long-term, severe disease it may be necessary to remove a part or the entire large intestine.

Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the world. It may not result in specific symptoms for a long time. One of the first symptoms may be weight loss or changing bowel habits, which are often not as alarming to the patient as abdominal pain, bleeding during defecation, persistent diarrhea, or anemia. The best prophylactic method for colorectal cancer is control colonoscopy after the age of 50 or earlier in the case of a history of colorectal cancer in the family. In the event of disturbing symptoms, a proctologist or gastroenterologist should be contacted as soon as possible, who will conduct a full diagnosis and plan appropriate treatment or refer you to an oncology hospital.

Book a Visit

Book a Visit

If you suspect any of the described diseases of the intestine, you should see a gastroenterologist. This doctor will select the appropriate diagnostics, implement the appropriate treatment and direct you to additional consultations with other doctors, if necessary. A radiologist, proctologist, hematologist, or dietician are specialists who can play an auxiliary role in the process of diagnosis and treatment. In the case of neoplastic lesions, an appointment with an oncologist and surgeon may also be necessary.

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